Reading Wrap-Up: May 2019

May was a bit of a funny reading month. I’d remembered it as all quite positive (not least because I did a lot of reading while we were on holiday in Italy) but then looking at my reading spreadsheet (yes, I know), I only read 5 books and the quality was a bit hit and miss!

First up was The Girl in the Red Coat by Kate Hamer, which I only gave 2 stars out of 5. I picked it up because I’m trying to make a real effort to read the books that I’ve had for years this year. It’s about a young child, Carmel, who is kidnapped while at a storytelling festival with her mum but believes her kidnapper when he tells her that her mother is dead and that he is her grandfather and so has no idea that she ought to be trying to get home. It’s all quite tense early on and I was flying through it. As the story went on though, I started struggling. Carmel gets dragged into a world of religious healings and the novel becomes less about Carmel being missing and more about her exploitation by her ‘grandfather’. It was frustrating to read, repetitive and only really skimmed the surface of what was going on. The ending came out of nowhere and wasn’t the ‘pay off’ I wanted. All a bit meh.

While I was on holiday, I moved onto The Time Machine by H. G. Wells. I love a bit of time travel, this was short and another that I’ve had on my Kindle since 2014. It was fine. 3 star fine. The version I read was only 124 pages so it was a bit bish-bash-bosh light touch for me. A man makes a time machine, nips thousands of years into the future, finds some friendly inhabitants and some not-so-friendly inhabitants and some peril and then zips home again. Boom. Job done. Worth a try but not amazing.

After those two, I was desperate for something strong and turned to a favourite author – Brandon Sanderson. I read the first book in his Mistborn trilogy way back in 2015 so reading The Well of Ascension was long overdue. I had to read a catch-up online because we get straight back into the action in this second instalment but I easily settled back into the world and the characters. I love the magic systems that Sanderson creates and the one in this trilogy is no exception. It’s all based around consuming metals, with different metals giving those who can consume them different powers. The scope of the trilogy is…well, epic. This middle book was wonderful and I loved the ending. I only gave it 4 stars because there were times it was dawdling along. There’s a lot of politics and manoeuvring and it could easily have been 100 pages shorter but I really enjoyed it and I will absolutely be finishing the trilogy. Hopefully soon but who can say?

While trucking through the 781 page Sanderson there was an afternoon where I wanted a bit of a quick fix so I picked up Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol. I really, really enjoyed it. Also a solid 4 stars. It’s a fairly short graphic novel about a teenage girl, Anya, who falls into a hole one day and encounters the ghost of a girl who had previously fallen in and died. Let’s ignore the fact that someone died falling into a hole and nobody thought to cover it up and move on! Anya’s relationship with the ghost moves into dark territory and that’s all appropriately creepy and brilliant. What’s more impressive though is how the novel also manages to capture so well what it’s like being a teenage girl. The insecurities about your weight and how you look, trying to work out who you are and tackling idiot adolescent boys. Add in the fact that Anya is a Russian immigrant and struggles with being from a different culture and there’s a whole lot packed into the relatively few pages. Definitely recommended.

Last up was The Devil’s Dice by Roz Watkins. I loved this one too! Not quite 5 stars but a very high 4 stars. I got this in a Books and Beer subscription box earlier this year. Sadly the accompanying beers are long since gone but the book was worth the wait I inflicted on it. I love a good crime novel anyway and this one just felt so British and comforting to read (you know, for a book about murder). It had so much personality and the writing was fantastic. The novel is written in the first person from the perspective of DI Meg Dalton and the tone is wry and darkly funny. When the novel opens, a local patent attorney is found dead in a cave. A centuries old carving of the grim reaper and the victim’s own initials is found on the wall behind him. There are century old mysteries alongside the present danger and there are plenty of twists and turns that kept me guessing until the end. If you like a contemporary crime novel, you could do a lot worse!

And that was my May! A mixed bag but picked up at the end. What have you been reading recently?

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