Book Chat: ‘Nevernight’ and ‘Godsgrave’ by Jay Kristoff

I just finished Godsgrave by Jay Kristoff. Not as in ‘most recently’, as in about an hour ago. I wanted to spend most of this morning reading and I’ve tried picking up a non-fiction book but can’t think about anything other than the ending to Godsgrave so I’m just giving up and wallowing in/sharing my feelings about the Nevernight series as far as I’ve got.

Where to start? Let’s kick off with Nevernight, the first in the series. The basic premise that Mia Corvere has grown up in the shadow of her father’s execution for rebelling against the incumbent government. Her mother was imprisoned in a cruel jail and her baby brother is presumed dead. She’s pretty cross about the whole thing and has sworn her life to killing those she believes were responsible. She also happens to be a ‘darkin’, able to manipulate shadows and communicate with her shadowy non-cat, Mister Kindly (who is fabulous – what’s not to love about a sarcastic sort-of-cat?). Desperate to join the Red Church, an organisation of assassins, she quests off into the desert and pits herself against some brutal challenges and fellow apprentices and our story begins.

I love me a good boarding-school-with-trials story and this was no exception. I adored it. It’s gritty and dark and harsh but as Mia forms friendships and learns more about herself, there’s some light relief too. Be warned though, some of those friendships will break your heart.  Kristoff isn’t shy about killing people off. I’ve cried and stared at my Kindle in shock fairly regularly during both this and the next book. Deaths don’t feel gratuitous but that just makes them all the harder to read. Brace yourself!

Surprisingly enough for a series that’s already about assassins and a pretty vicious republic, Godsgrave manages to up the ante. Shit gets very real. There is much blood and many deaths and it’s not for the faint hearted. Without any spoilers, most of the book focuses on trials of the ‘gladiatii’. Yes, you guessed it. Not only do we have assassins, we also now have battles to the death between gladiator warrior types. The first part of the book (after a very handy refresher on the series so far) is split between catching readers up on how our characters have ended up where they are and in following this new plot line. It was a smidge disorientating at first but a few chapters in, I was hooked. There’s more of the fantastic world-building and character development from the first, with new threats, more political intrigue, more moments to make your heart hurt and twists and turns and…well, everything. It’s bloody brilliant.

There’s a whiff of Terry Pratchett about the series too (albeit very much Pratchett for grown-ups), with a wry, all-seeing narrator chipping in for prologues and epilogues and the occasional footnote. I’ve seen reviews by other readers saying that the footnotes ruined the book for them. I personally like them because they appeal to my fairly dry sense of humour and help expand the world a bit with back stories of towns, myths characters refer to or sayings they use. Read a few and see what you think but if they do bug you, you can skip them and you’ll miss nothing of the main story.

All of which is to say, if you’re a fantasy reader, you really NEED to read this series. If you aren’t usually a fantasy reader, it’s not too heavy on the fantastical side and there isn’t a lot of magic so I wouldn’t say it’s only for the hardcore fans by any stretch – definitely worth giving a try! The hype has died down but it’s one of the best series I’ve read in recent years. I wouldn’t be surprised if by the end of the day I’d bought and started the final instalment (the cliffhangers at the end of the second books are killing me) but I’m trying to hold out for a little while…

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